3. Prayer

  1. Our monastic base inspires us to seek “God alone.” The most important task of the Companions of Christ is to prayerfully worship God. Our approach to prayer embodies an integration of many spiritual traditions. Inspired by St. Francis of Assisi, we seek not so much to pray, as to become a prayer.

  2. Eucharist:
    Essential to all of our devotions is the celebration of the Holy Eucharist, daily, if possible. When a priest is not available, we receive during communion services presided over by a deacon or Eucharistic minister.

  3. Divine Office:
    After the example of St. Benedict, nothing is to be preferred to the work of God. The Liturgy of the Hours is a school of continual prayer and a priceless component in the monastic way of life. After the example of the entire monastic heritage, the community prays the Liturgy of the Hours in common, daily, wherever the brothers and sisters live together, or wherever they come together. Ordinarily the preferable place for this is a church or oratory. Upon communal discernment, the formal liturgical office may be substituted by a totally spontaneous common prayer and for various periods of time. However, let the preeminence of the Divine Office always be preserved and practiced. The Offices of this community shall be Morning Prayer (Matins), Noonday Prayer (Diurnal), Evening Prayer (Vespers), and Night Prayer (Compline).

  4. Charismatic:
    In the common prayer of the community, we are open to the charismatic expressions of the Holy Spirit. In this freedom to move in the Holy Spirit, let reason and reverence be safeguarded through the grace and discernment on the part of both the community and leadership.

  5. Devotions:
    In our devotions we give special attention to those reflecting on the mysteries of the life of Christ. We also honor the saints who are given to us as examples of the following of Christ. All devotions are guided by the wisdom of the Scriptures and the tradition of the Church.

  6. Contemplation:
    The Companions of Christ are helped toward the stage of contemplation in theory and in practice. The writings of the mystics of the Church, especially those of the monastic tradition, are to be used as often as possible. Also, both private and communal times of retreat in solitude and silence are provided for.

    1. The ancient monastic custom of Lectio Divina, or sacred reading, which leads on to meditation and contemplation is emphasized as well as the Jesus Prayer of the Hesychast, or silent and still tradition of the Christian monks of the East. But each individual is free to engage in the approach best suited for him or her. The modern integration of Breath Prayer as taught by the Rev. Ron Delbene is also encouraged with the help of good spiritual direction from within or without the community.